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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

3 edition of Hemispheric processing of kinesthetically oriented spatial perception found in the catalog.

Hemispheric processing of kinesthetically oriented spatial perception

Hemispheric processing of kinesthetically oriented spatial perception

  • 188 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Muscular sense.,
  • Laterality.,
  • Space perception.,
  • Sex differences (Psychology)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Sho Nishizawa.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination[10], 113 leaves
    Number of Pages113
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17772717M

    a. The right brain is more important in the creative process than the left brain. b. The left brain is more important in the creative process than the right brain. c. Both sides of the brain are important to the creative process. d. Motivation, not the brain is the key to the creative process. Hemispheric Lateralization during Spatial Imagery. As can be seen in Figure Figure1, 1, most functional imaging studies show bilateral fronto-parietal networks to be activated during the execution of spatial fact that both, left and right posterior parietal cortex (PPC; mostly SPL and IPS) is recruited during spatial imagery, is, at first glance, in contrast to most Cited by:

    Spatial frequency processing has been studied with psychophysical techniques in humans and neurophysiological methods in animals. In psychophysical studies of human performance in adults, spatial frequency processing has been evaluated with two approaches, depending on whether stimuli are presented at very low levels of contrast or are presented well above contrast by: Hemispheric asymmetry of spatial frequency process-ing is also known to be task dependent. For example, there are clear interactions between spatial frequency and hemisphere for spatial frequency discrimination (Proverbio, Zani, & Avella, ; Kitterle & Selig, ) but not for simple detection (Kitterle et al., ). How-.

    When Side Matters: Hemispheric Processing and the Visual Specificity of Emotional Memories Elizabeth A. Kensinger and Elizabeth S. Choi Boston College Previous studies have shown that the right hemisphere processes the visual details of objects and the emotionality of information. These two roles of the right hemisphere have not been examined. Spatial perception is defined as the ability to perceive spatial relationships in respect to the orientation of one's body despite distracting information. It consists of being able to perceive and visually understand outside spatial information such as features, properties, measurement, shapes, position and motion. For example, when one is navigating through a dense forest they are using.


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Hemispheric processing of kinesthetically oriented spatial perception Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Hemispheric processing of kinesthetically oriented spatial perception. [Sho Nishizawa]. Right cerebral hemispheric lateralization for spatial perception has been reported by using visual and tactile spatial tasks in brain-damaged patients, split-brain patients, and normal subjects.

The main purpose of the present study was to investigate whether or not kinesthetic spatial perception was dominantly processed with the right cerebral hemisphere as : Sho Nishizawa. Hemispheric processing of kinesthetically oriented spatial perception.

Abstract. Graduation date: Right cerebral hemispheric lateralization for spatial\ud perception has been reported by using visual and tactile\ud spatial tasks in brain-damaged patients, split-brain\ud patients, and normal subjects. was to investigate whether or.

HEMISPHERIC PROCESSING OF KINESTHETICALLY ORIENTED SPATIAL PERCEPTION CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Normal human behavior in part depends upon maintaining spatial orientation that is calibrated through many of the sensory modalities. Spatial orientation includes the dimen-sional relation of the body to the environment and the rela-tive position of body parts.

This paper is based upon a dissertation submitted by the author to the Psychology Department of Stanford University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosphy, “Hemispheric Specialization for the Processing of Visually Presented Verbal and Spatial Stimuli: A Reaction Time Analysis.” Cited by: The results suggest that information loss occurs during hemispheric transfer.

INTRODUCTION A SUPERIORITY of the minor hemisphere for visuo-spatial processing has been found in commissurotomy patients [1], the brain-injured [], and normal subjects [5]. In comparison, there is little evidence relating to tactuo-spatial by: The left hemisphere seems to be involved in categorical processing without necessarily involving language processing (Kosslyn et al., ).

Some even claim that this left-lateralised categorical. A hemispheric asymmetry in somatosensory processing. The model presented in the target article includes feature processing and higher representations. I argue, based on neuropsychological evidence, that spatial representations are also involved in perceptual awareness of somatosensory : Giuseppe Vallar.

Categorical spatial relation processing is thought to be lateralized to the left, whereas coordinate spatial relation processing is argued to be right lateralized. Over the years, many experimental studies have been performed concerning this distinction, which have enabled a fine-tuning of the original theory (see for review, e.g.

Jager and Postma,Laeng et al.,Laeng, ).Cited by: Related to spatial processing is the pseudoneglect, the tendency of healthy subjects to exhibit a leftward bias when they are asked to mark the center of a horizontal line (the so-called line bisection task; Jewell and McCourt, ).

This leftward bisection bias is thought to be due to right-hemispheric dominance for spatial processing which leads to a systematic overrepresentation of the left.

The left hand advantage in these spatial manual tasks is believed to stem from the fact that the right hemisphere is specialized for spatial information processing and that the direct neuroanatomical connection between the right hemisphere and the left hand has an advantage in information transfer over the indirect connection of the right hemisphere to the right hand through the corpus by: hemispheric asymmetry in visual perception.

Keywords: Hemispheric asymmetry, visual perception, Double Filtering by Frequency (DFF), autoencoder networks.

Introduction The way we analyze and process the global and local forms of visual stimuli has been extensively examined.

Navon () proposed the "global precedence hypothesis",File Size: KB. Thus the simple notion of a left hemispheric advantage for relatively high spatial frequency⧹local processing and a right hemisphere advantage for relatively low spatial frequency⧹global processing is not confirmed by our neurophysiological measurements.

Although our relatively high spatial frequency stimuli are within the low absolute range, Cited by:   The right hemisphere of the brain is responsible for some of the cognitive functions such as attention, processing of visual shapes and patterns, emotions, verbal ambiguity, and implied meanings.

Children below 3 years old are predominantly governed by the right brain. The right hemisphere’s role for spatial processing during visuomotor planning was predicted given its role in perception. A relationship between the right hemisphere and spatial processing has previously only been described during visuomotor tasks with high spatial and high temporal processing demands.

Consequently, the previously observed right-lateralized effects during visuomotor processing could also have been related to temporal by: 4. Hemispheric asymmetry for visual information processing Joseph B. Hellige Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CAUSA, email: [email protected] Abstract.

The left and right hemispheres of humans do not handle all aspects of visual information processing with equal ability. This isFile Size: 2MB. Stimuli for the CSF were linear and vertically oriented and had sine wave gratings with spatial frequencies of, and cycles per degree (cpd).

Hemispheric asymmetries in spatial frequency processing can reflect relative, not absolute, differences in selected spatial frequencies (Hellige, ; Christman et al., ), and the same spatial frequency can be preferentially processed by either the left or right hemisphere, depending on the range of task-relevant spatial frequencies (Ivry & Robertson, ).

This relative nature of hemispheric asymmetries in Cited by: sphere is oriented towards the processing of detailed observation and information whereas the right hemisphere is dominantly engaged in peripheral experiences an d the perception of entities. Sex differences in spatial ability: A lateralization of function approach Article (PDF Available) in Brain and Cognition 56(3) January with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Jackson wrote that the processing of visual information, perception, and visual imagery are all the province of the right cerebral hemisphere, whereas the processing of auditory information, verbal expression, and prepositional thinking are the domain of the left hemisphere (J.

Taylor, /).Spatial perception is the ability to be aware of your relationships with the environment around you (exteroceptive processes) and with yourself (interoceptive processes). Spatial awareness is made up of two processes, the exteroceptives, which create representations about our space through feelings, and interoceptive processes, which create.Indeed, since the right hemisphere is responsible for our holistic perception of the world, one might argue that it is the dominant one, with the ‘left brain’ functioning as ‘analyzer for the right brain’s perceptions a servant of the right brain’ (“Philosophical and Theological Reflection,” ).” 6.